PR-Foto von Jack Nasher

 

In former times the common opinion was:

For success in sales you need one thing above all else:

You have to be an expert in your field, so to say, a specialist – so the common doctrine of generations of sellers to convince people.

 

FALSE!

 

That might have been true 20 years ago.

 

Digitization has caused that markets are saturated and those interested are well informed that nothing more can be done with competence in the own field alone.

 

Today not so much the technical knowledge and expertise counts.

 

WHAT WE SHOULD LEARN …

 

Competence does not speak for itself (we can be the best in our field and no one realizes it)

Competence is difficult to assess (how can a layperson properly assess the competence of a professional?)

 

What matters more about success?

The “perceived” competence and not the “actual” competence.

 

Competence is not demonstrated by the use of many foreign words. A look at the offers of online marketing consultants, web designers, etc. often shows that they formulate to a large extent past their target groups.

 

Success Factor: Confident Appearance  

 

You have to be confident and convincing, and you have to have good arguments why you think so.

 

WHAT WE SHOULD LEARN …

 

If you act competently, you will become more competent.

Increasing “perceived competence” also increases “actual competence”.

If you give an impression of competence, you will be treated accordingly. If a doctor performs competently, he is also perceived as competent.

And what else is important: If you act competently, you give others the opportunity to shine with your own abilities. It opens up opportunities in life.

 

Now another question:

What is the proportion of the competence of an actor in the successful solution to a task?

Just this question, the American psychologists John Darley and George Goethals went after and came to the following conclusion:

The observer relies on three key aspects when assessing a result, besides competence:

1.) Motivation

2) Difficulty Level

3) Luck

 

And the psychologists then put these connections into a formula:

E = [(F + F’) * (M + M’)] + (S + S’) + G

E = Result

F = Steadily present skills (perceived competence)

F’ = Temporary limitations of skills

M = Steadily present factors of motivation

M’ = Temporary present factors of motivation

S = Usual level of difficulty

S’ = Factors temporarily affecting the degree of difficulty

G = Luck

 

So, the harder the task is, the more bad luck comes along and the less effort the actor gives, the bigger the proportion of the factor competence has to be.

 

RELY ON YOUR EXPERTISE …

AND ALSO BENEFIT FROM YOUR TRUE COMPETENCE !

LEARN TO PRESENT YOURSELF!

 

TRY TO GAIN MAXIMUM TRUST!

 

(Source: Book “ÜBERZEUGT!” of Jack Nasher)

(Jack Nasher taught at Oxford University and is a professor at the Munich Business School, reading and convincing people – that’s his expertise.)

 

(Photo Credit: PR-Foto of Jack Nasher)

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